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Archive February 2017

Toward a sympathetic critique of Thomas Sankara

Over the past few years, several, partly scathing critiques of African political heroes have been published in larger works of history and ethnography. Thus the Patrice Lumumba of David Van Reybrouck’s Congo is a young, inspiring man whose fiery rhetoric outstrips his coalition-building  and governance capacity.

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Volunteering is vanishing in Nigeria

According to Dictionary.com, “Volunteerism is the policy or practice of volunteering one’s time or talents for charitable, educational, or other worthwhile activities, especially in one’s community.” Volunteers are driven by passion to leave a noble legacy of service to humanity.

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Xenophobia in South Africa and Nigeria

Nigerians are rightly outraged by the xenophobic attacks committed by some South Africans against Africans from other parts of the continent. The attacks bring shame to the country of Nelson Mandela. In condemning the attacks, there should not be the mistaken belief that all South Africans are xenophobic – the xenophobes are the minority.

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Governance in Africa: What do the numbers tell us?

Africa’s track record of governance since independence is, at best, mixed. Despite the moderate socio-economic and political progress made since independence, only a few countries have improved their performance relative to those in other parts of the world, and these are mostly recent developments confined to some of the smallest countries on the continent.

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Kenya to cut arts education fund for technical schools

Kenyan universities could face slashed governmental allocations beginning next financial year if some of the funds are diverted to technical institutions. The move is part of the changes contained in a new curriculum that is expected to take effect in May this year. If implemented, this will make a radical shift to technical and science courses against arts and social sciences.

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The satirist who pokes fun at everyday things in Africa

In real life, comedians can be surprisingly serious and sombre people, carrying the weight of the world on their shoulders and projecting an angst — a far cry from their on-stage or in front-of-the-camera persona. The Nigerian-British host of BBC’s satirical show What’s Up Africa, is no different. Only that he does not view himself as a comedian.

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