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  • on 28.09.2014
  • at 03:00 PM
  • by Kevin Hind

Opinion: The fight against the long-term effects of child hunger reaches fever pitch 0

Sep28

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‘Children just need to be allowed to grow to their full potential and good things will follow’, write Noel Marie Zagre, UNICEF’s Regional Nutrition Adviser for Eastern & Southern Africa, and Gary Quince, Head of the European Union Delegation to the African Union.

Eric Turyasingura chases after a ball made from plastic bags outside his mud-brick home in the mountains of southern Uganda.

Yelling in his tribal tongue, Nkore, “Arsenal with the ball! Arsenal with the ball!” he jostles with his younger brothers for possession.

The fame of the English soccer club has reached even his little ears. Pretending to be a sports star offers a moment of escape from his daily struggles.

At five years old, Eric’s tiny body already tells a story of poverty and lost opportunity. He is six inches shorter than he should be for his age. His arms and legs are pencil-thin and his head is out of proportion to his body.

Because he is stunted, experts say his chances growing up healthy, learning at full potential, and getting a job, let alone play professional soccer, have been greatly diminished.

In 2013, a United Nations Report said one in four children under five years, across the world – a total of 165 million – were stunted, while last year The Lancet estimated that undernutrition contributed 45 percent of all under-5 deaths.

Often beginning in the womb as poverty-stricken mothers live hand-to-mouth, stunting can be a lifelong affliction. Studies show it is linked to poor cognition and educational performance, low adult wages and lost productivity. A stunted child is nearly five times more likely to die from diarrhoea than a non-stunted child because of the physiological changes in a stunted body.

continue reading on IPS Africa

By Noel Marie Zagre and Gary Quince IPS Africa

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