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  • on 22.12.2014
  • at 04:07 PM
  • by Kevin

Africa is a country recommends: Books of 2014 0

Christmas is coming, and like the German Bundesliga we’re going to be taking a wee break on AIAC, returning in the early days of 2015.

Everyone has their own ways of getting through those long, blogless days of festive family over-eating, and AIAC generally relies on Gin and Tonic, long walks, and English football. But there are also books. Remember those? Especially good for giving you that faraway feeling as you try to zone out of your uncle’s homophobic musings. Here are some recommendations from AIAC contributors for some books we enjoyed in 2014 (not exhaustive by any means, please add your own favorites in the comments).

Sean Jacobs: Barnaby Phillips’ Another Man’s War. Promoting the release of his World War II film, Miracle at St Anna, director Spike Lee upbraided Clint Eastwood who did two films about Iwo Jima “back to back and there was not one black soldier in both of those films.” Lee’s outburst was part self-aggrandizement and also expressed frustration with the erasure of black, or African, soldiers’ involvements in “the Great Wars.”  Which is why Another Man’s War: The Story of a Burma Boy in Britain’s Forgotten Army (2014) by journalist Barnaby Phillips is my best book of 2014. Another Man’s Warcovers the extraordinary tale of a 16-year old Nigerian soldier, Isaac Fadoyebo, who volunteered for Britain’s colonial army in Southeast Asia (at least 100,000 Africans went to fight), whose company is routed by the Japanese and manages to survive the war through a mix of guile and kindness and protection of local people. But the book is more than that: it is a window into the workings of British colonialism in Nigeria and a corrective to “Greatest Generation” myth-making.

Honorable Mention: Clicko, The Wild Dancing Bushman (2009) by Neil Parsons. The story of Franz Taibosch, a Korana (Khoi) from what is now South Africa’s Eastern Cape, who was a fixture of 1920s and 1930s traveling circuses in the United States.

Continue reading at Africasacountry

By Elliott Ross

Photo Credit: az via Flickr 

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